Tag: mindsets


Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset

Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset

Dr. Carol Dweck, a professor at Stanford University, has done extensive research on mindsets. Through her research, Dr. Dweck discovered that some people have a fixed mindset and others a growth mindset.

Fixed mindset – you believe your attributes and abilities are inherently fixed and will not change no matter how much effort you put in.

Growth mindset – you believe your talents and abilities can be improved and developed through your actions and efforts.

Fixed mindset vs. Growth Mindset

 

Influences on Personal Development

Dweck found that the mindset you take affects how you live your life. She discovered your mindset shapes your attitude and creates your entire perception of what is attainable.  She believes what you think and how you think determines your behavior and thus predicts your success.

 

Characteristics of the Fixed Mindset

If you have a fixed mindset, you believe you either are or are not good at something based on your inherent nature. You believe that you have a certain amount of intelligence and talent, and nothing can change that. You feel it does not matter how much effort you put in, your talents or intelligence is fixed.  Therefore, you tend to think that your effort is fruitless. And, if you do put in effort and fail at a new task or skill, you feel your effort was wasted.

With a fixed mindset, you tend to avoid challenges because failure suggests that you lack the intelligence needed to be successful. You believe failures define who you are as a person, so you avoid even trying. You stick with what you know to keep up your self-confidence. You feel getting things wrong and receiving feedback is negative and it reveals your flaws and personal limitations. So you try to hide your flaws so you are not looked at as a failure.

A fixed mindset often prevents you from developing new skills or abilities that would bring a feeling of fulfillment and happiness to your life.

 

Characteristics of the Growth Mindset

If you have a growth mindset, you believe your talents can be developed through hard work, learning, and feedback. You believe you can be good at anything, because your abilities are entirely due to your actions and efforts.

With a growth mindset, you believe effort is necessary to grow and master new skills. The more effort you put in the closer you get to mastery of the skill. If you make mistakes along the way, you view them as an aid to learning. To you, mistakes are an essential part of the learning process and show your effort.  You believe failures are just temporary setbacks, so you persist through those setbacks.   Thus, you embrace challenges because you believe it will help you improve your performance.

With a growth mindset, you welcome feedback from others because it helps enhance your abilities. You do not perceive it as criticism about you as a person, but rather about your current abilities. Therefore, more feedback you get the better you can become.

If you have a growth mindset, you tend to achieve more than those with a more fixed mindset because you worry less about failing and you put more energy into learning and developing skills.  Most importantly, you are more likely maximize your full potential.

 

Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset Chart

 

 

Key Points – Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset

Characteristics of a Fixed Mindset

  1. Believes intelligence and talent are fixed
  2. Sticks with what they know
  3. Believes putting forth effort is worthless or fruitless
  4. Believes personal failures define who they are
  5. Hides flaws so not to be judged as a failure
  6. Avoids challenges to avoid failure
  7. Tends to give up easy
  8. Ignores feedback from others
  9. Views feedback as personal criticism
  10. Feels threatened by the success of others

 

Characteristics of a Growth Mindset

  1. Believes intelligence and talents can be developed
  2. Believes effort is the path to mastery
  3. Believes mistakes are an essential part of learning
  4. Views failure as an opportunity to learn
  5. Believes failures are just temporary setbacks
  6. Embraces challenges
  7. Welcomes feedback from others in order to learn
  8. Believes feedback is a guide to further improvement
  9. Views feedback as a source of information
  10. Views other’s success as a source of inspiration and information

 

 

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Mindsets

Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset

 

 

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Fixed Mindset and Growth Mindset

Fixed Mindset and Growth Mindset

Fixed Mindset and Growth Mindset

Dr. Carol Dweck of Stanford University has done extensive research on mindsets. Through her research, Dweck found that the mindset you take affects how you live your life. She believes what you think and how you think determines your behavior and predicts your success.

 

Fixed Mindset and Growth Mindset

Dr. Dweck determined that some people have a fixed mindset while others have a growth mindset.

Fixed Mindset – you believe your attributes and abilities are inherently fixed and will not change no matter how much effort you put in.

Growth Mindset – you believe your talents and abilities can be improved and developed through your actions.

Fixed mindset vs. Growth Mindset

 

Mindset

A mindset is a particular way of thinking or a frame of mind. It includes your perceptions or your beliefs about your abilities and personal qualities such as intelligence or creativity.

In her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success: How We Can Learn to Fulfill Our Potential, Dr. Dweck, describes both the fixed mindset and growth mindset and how they can affect your performance.

“In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. They spend their time documenting their intelligence or talent instead of developing them. They also believe that talent alone creates success—without effort. They’re wrong.”

“In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment. Virtually all great people have had these qualities.”

 

Effect of Mindsets

Dr. Dweck believes that your mindset creates your entire perception of what is attainable. She believes it shapes your attitude and is the ultimate factor in whether you fail or succeed.

If you have a fixed mindset, you believe you either are or are not good at something, based on your inherent abilities. You believe that you have a certain amount of intelligence and talent and nothing can change that.

On the contrary, if you have a growth mindset, you believe your talents can be developed through hard work, learning, and feedback from others. You believe you can be good at anything, because your abilities are entirely due to your actions.

Fixed Mindset and Growth Mindset image

Mindset and Personal Development

Bottom line is that those with a growth mindset tend to achieve more than those with a more fixed mindset, because they worry less about failing and they put more time and energy into learning and developing skills.  Sadly, a fixed mindset often prevents people from developing new skills or abilities that would ultimately bring happiness and personal fulfillment to his or her life.

For example, if you think, “I’m not a good athlete” then that belief acts as an excuse from engaging in athletic activities. The fixed mindset prevents you from failing in the short run, but in the long run it impedes your ability to learn new skills to develop and grow as a person. However, if you had a growth mindset, you would be willing to try a new sport even if you failed at first. You would see failure and setbacks as an indication that you should continue developing those skills, rather than an indicator of something you cannot accomplish.

As a result, if you have a growth mindset, you are more likely to maximize your potential. You tend to take feedback and learn from it to overcome challenges, rather than view it as criticism.

 

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Mindsets

Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset

 

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Mindsets

 Mindset

 

What are Mindsets?

A mindset is a particular way of thinking or a frame of mind. Your mindset is your mental attitude or set of opinions that you have formed about something through experience, education, upbringing, and/or culture. You can have a mindset on a particular event, topic, item, or person. For example, you may think that a particular person is difficult to deal with. You can also have a general mindset about life or the world.   For example, you may have a positive mindset about the world and look at the world and its events positively.

 

About mindsets:

  • Affected by experience, education, and/or culture
  • Tend to be fixed, but can change
  • Form quickly, but resistant to change
  • Help determine actions and behaviors
  • Affects how you perceive the world around you as well as yourself
  • Affects your personal development and performance

 

 

Fixed State of Mind

By technical definition, a mindset is a fixed state of mind, hence mind“set”. However, a mindset can be changed. You may first have a particular frame of mind about a person, event, or topic, but change that mindset after certain experiences. For example, you may have an original mindset that carrots taste bad, but after having tasted some served in a new way, you may change your mindset.

 

Resistant to Change

Although mindsets can change, they tend to change slowly. That is especially true if you have long held beliefs about something. The longer the held belief, the harder it is to change that belief. For example, if you believe eating an apple a day is good for you, you would find it difficult to believe someone if he or she told you otherwise.

Even though they are generally quick to form, they are resistant to change. A mindset is like a stake in the ground holding a tent in place. It can be moved, but once it is in place you tend not to move it unless there is a good reason to move it.

Once you have formed a mindset about an event or experience this conditions your future perspective of that or similar events. For example, you may think an event next Saturday will be boring because the last event you experienced with that same group of people was boring. When you get there it may not be boring at all, but it will probably take you a while to change your mindset.

 

Cycle

Since your mind is processing new information all the time, that information can affect your mindset. Your mindset is rooted in your experiences, education, and culture from which you form thoughts which establish beliefs and attitudes. Those thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes lead to certain actions and with those actions you have experiences. Those experiences gives your mind new information to process. Your thought process may affect your beliefs and attitudes about certain people, events, topics, or items. The cycle continues with each of your new actions and experiences.

 

Mindset cycle

 

Determines Actions and Behaviors

Your mindset can predetermine your interpretations and responses to events, circumstances, and situations. Since your mindset is your collection of thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs, it will affect what you feel and what you do.  For example, if you think a specific event is going to be boring, you probably will not attend that event. Similarly, if you feel a person is not a nice person, you may take actions to avoid him or her.

 

 

Mindset About Who You Are

Your mindset not only impacts how you perceive the world around you, but also how you see yourself. You have certain mindsets about yourself and your abilities. Your mindsets have a lot to do with self-confidence, self-esteem, as well as self-development as a whole.

 

Growth Mindset vs. Fixed-Mindset

Dr. Carol Dweck of Stanford University has done extensive research on mindsets. Dr. Dweck believes some people have a fixed mindset and other a growth mindset. In her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success: How We Can Learn to Fulfill Our Potential, Dr. Dweck, describes the two different mindsets.

“In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. They spend their time documenting their intelligence or talent instead of developing them. They also believe that talent alone creates success—without effort. They’re wrong.”

“In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment. Virtually all great people have had these qualities.”

 

Think about how you view your abilities, intelligence and personality. Do you see these qualities simply fixed traits or are they things you can cultivate and develop throughout your life?

 

 

Additional Links

Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset

Fixed Mindset vs. Growth Mindset

 

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