Tag: Lateral thinking


Six Thinking Hats

Six Thinking Hats

Six Thinking Hats method was created by Edward De Bono as a model for explore different perspectives towards dealing with a complex situation, problem, or challenge. It is a simple, effective thinking process that helps you be more productive and focused when dealing with a situation.

 

 

About the Six Thinking Hats Technique

The Six Thinking Hats is a technique used to look at situations from different points of view. This technique helps you move away from habitual thinking styles and towards a broader view of a situation or problem. The process encourages you to deliberately use six different modes of thinking where otherwise you may be trapped by only one way of thinking.

six-thinking-hats

Why Use the Technique

You cannot be emotional, objective, logical, and creative all at the same time. The Six Thinking Hats method allows you to focus your thought process. By wearing a specific colored hat, you focus on that particular mode of thinking. By switching “hats,” you can easily redirect and focus your thoughts on a different mode of thinking.

 

 

How it Works

There are six different imaginary hats that you can put on or take off. Each hat is a different color and represents a different style or mode of thinking. You can put on or take off one of these “hats” to indicate the type of thinking you are using. When you change your hat, you change your thinking.

 

 

Each Hat Represents a Different Style of Thinking

White hat: neutral and objective. It is concerned with facts and figures

Red hat: emotional view and feelings. It deals with emotions and hunches.

Black hat: caution, judging, and evaluating. It points out weaknesses in an idea.

Yellow hat: Positive, sunny, and optimistic. It explore the positives and benefits

Green hat: creativity and new ideas. It is an opportunity to discover new concepts.

Blue hat: big picture, cool and controlled. It used to manage the thinking process.

debono-six-hats

The hats are just visual cues to allow you to easily switch your mode of thinking. By putting on and taking off these imaginary hats, you switch from one type of thinking to another. For example, you may use the green hat to generate ideas, and then use the black hat to vet the ideas by evaluating them.

 

 

Group Discussions

This techniques can be very effective in group discussions on addressing a situation or problem. A specific colored hat may be used to request the group to direct the discussion toward a specific mode of thinking such as creative or logical.

This technique ensures that all the people in the group are focused on and thinking about the same subject in the same way at the same time. Therefore, when done in a group, it is important that everybody wear the same hat at the same time. You do not want one person generating ideas when another person just shoots those ideas done.

 

 

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Lateral Thinking Techniques

Lateral Thinking Techniques

Lateral thinking is the mental process of generating ideas and solving problems by looking at a situation or problem from a unique perspective. It is the ability to think creatively or “outside the box.”

Lateral thinking involves breaking away from traditional modes of thinking and discarding established patterns and preconceived notions.

About Lateral Thinking Lateral thinking is a term coined by Edward De Bono in 1967 in his book The Use of Lateral Thinking. De Bono explained typical problem solving techniques involve a linear, step-by-step approach. He believes a more creative answers can be obtained by taking a step sideways to re-examine a situation or problem from an entirely different viewpoint.

Analytical vs. Lateral Thinking

 

Lateral Thinking Techniques

Lateral thinking techniques provide a deliberate, systematic process that results in innovative thinking. By using these unconventional thinking techniques, lateral thinking enables you to find creative solutions that you may otherwise not consider.

Below are seven techniques to help you elicit creative ideas that can be both novel and useful solutions to a problem.

  1. Alternatives
  2. Focus
  3. Challenge
  4. Random Entry
  5. Provocation and Movement
  6. Harvesting
  7. Treatment of Ideas

Lateral Thinking Techniques

Lateral Thinking Techniques Explained

  1. Alternatives: Use concepts to breed new ideas
  2. Focus: Sharpen or change your focus to improve your creative efforts
  3. Challenge: Break free from the limits of accepted ways of doing things
  4. Random Entry: Use unconnected input to open new lines of thinking
  5. Provocation and Movement: Move from a provocative statement to useful ideas
  6. Harvesting: Select the best ideas and shape them into practical solutions
  7. Treatment of Ideas: Strengthen and shape ideas to fit an organization or situation

 

Alternatives

This techniques is about using concepts as a breeding ground for new ideas. Concepts are general theories or ways of doing things. By thinking of a variety of ways to implement a concept is one way to generate ideas. You can then further assessed each specific idea to generate additional concepts. Establishing a new concept creates a whole new way for generating more ideas.

 

Focus

This techniques is about learning when and how to change your focus to improve your creative efforts. You can learn to focus on areas that other people have not bothered to think about. Doing so may lead you to a breakthrough idea simply because you are the first person to pay any attention to that area.

 

Challenge

Challenge technique is about breaking free from the limits of traditional thinking and the accepted ways of doing things. It is based on the assumption that there may be a different and better way to do something even if there is no apparent problem with the current way.

 

Random Entry

Random Entry techniques is about using unconnected input to open up new lines of thinking. This technique draws on your mind to find connections between seemingly unrelated things. With this techniques, you can use a randomly chosen word, picture, sound, or other stimulus to open new lines of thinking.

 

Provocation and Movement

Provocation is about generating provoking thoughts and using them to build new ideas. It is a process that enables you to think outside the box in order to get a compelling list of innovative ideas to consider.

 

Harvesting

Harvesting techniques involves selecting specific ideas that seem practical and have the most value then reshaping them into practical solutions. It is about turning starter ideas into workable ideas. This technique is done toward the end of a thinking session in order to select ideas that may prove to be valuable in the current situation or in the future. Harvesting helps you identify ideas that could be implemented right away as well as those that may need more work.

 

Treatment of Ideas

Treatment of Ideas involves shaping and strengthening ideas so they best fit a given organization or situation.  The treatment technique is best for working with starter ideas to make them more specific and practical for a given situation. For example, you may think of some constraints that might interfere with the execution of an idea, so you shape or restructure the idea to fit within the constraints.

 

 

References:

De Bono, E. (1967). New Think: The Use of Lateral Thinking in the Generation of New Ideas. New York: Basic Books.

De Bono, E. (1969). The mechanism of mind. New York: Simon and Schuster.

De Bono, E. (1970). Lateral thinking: creativity step by step. New York: Harper &

Row.

De Bono, E. (1971a). Lateral Thinking for Management. New York: McGraw-Hill.

 

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Lateral Thinking

Lateral Thinking

Thinking outside the box

Lateral thinking is the mental process of generating ideas and solving problems by looking at a situation from a unique or different perspective.  This type of thinking involves breaking away from traditional modes of thinking and discarding established patterns and preconceived notions.

By using unconventional thinking techniques, lateral thinking enables you to find innovative solutions that you may otherwise not even consider.

Lateral Analtical Thinking

About Lateral Thinking

Lateral thinking is a term coined by Edward De Bono in 1967 in his book New Think: The Use of Lateral Thinking in the Generation of New Ideas. De Bono explained typical problem solving techniques involve a linear, step-by-step approach. He believes a more creative solutions can be obtained by taking a step sideways to look at a situation or problem from an entirely different viewpoint.

 

 

A Different Mode of Thinking

Lateral thinking is different from other standard modes of thinking and problem solving.  It lies between vertical thinking (classic step-by-step method of problem solving) and brainstorming.

Vertical thinking involves working out the solution step-by-step from the given data. Brainstorming is about generating many ideas, but not being concerned with the detailed implementation of them.

Lateral Thinking

 

Lateral thinking is similar to brainstorming in that it involves deliberately going outside of the standard bounded thought process. However, unlike brainstorming, it still uses a systematic process that leads to logical conclusions.

It is like vertical thinking in that it is a uses a systematic process that leads to logical conclusions. However, unlike vertical thinking, it involves changing a standard thinking sequence and arriving at the solution from completely different angles.

 

 

Lateral vs. Vertical Thinking

Vertical thinking uses the processes of logic. Vertical thinking is analytical, sequenced, deliberate, and precise. It involves taking the data from a problem and analyzing it with defined methodologies to find logical solutions.

Lateral thinking involves using reasoning that is not straightforward and obvious. It involves generating ideas that are often not obtainable using just traditional step-by-step logic.

Analytical vs. Lateral Thinking

 

Four Principles

The theory behind lateral thinking is that many problems require a different perspective in order to successfully solve them. It focuses on what could be rather than what is possible or likely. To accomplish this, De Bono identified four principles to guide you through the thinking process:

  1. Recognize the dominant ideas that polarize the perception of a problem.
  2. Search for different ways of looking at things.
  3. Relax the strict control applied to the rational-logical (vertical) thinking.
  4. Use chance to encourage other ideas

 

 

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